Timothy Mackrell

An object is a container of personal information and memory. It carries details about the people who produced, used, collected, discarded or lost it. An object can form part of a portrait of its owner, an extension or prosthesis of their personality embedded in their interactions with the object.

 

The adaptations of personal objects that form the basis of this series magnify traces of such interactions, which are visible as a type of patina.
A density of information remains to hint at a story behind each object, at real personal memories, but the objects seem to remember nothing but their own details.

This collection of images brings together deceptively ordinary items. The project explores a territory which embraces the quotidian and ideas of collective associations. The small items that I have photographed are personal but they are also common. They aim to link recognition and memory in an indirect way. However, the images are more than mere representations of personal objects. They are representations of replicas of things that I have fabricated myself. Playing with notions of the double, of originality and duplication, this series implies a duplicity at the heart of photography.

 

In the process of making the work, original objects are photographed, then these photographs are used to guide sculptural reconstructions. The reconstructions become a new subject to be photographed using macroscopic photographic techniques, and are presented as final works.

The scale of these ephemeral images is now monumental. Photographs of a pen, a ring, a screwdriver at this scale would have been compelling in themselves, but the process of constructing objects to mimic the originals draws attention to the complicated nature of perception itself.

 

The final photographs are intended to be sculptural, to be objects as well as images of objects. They also ask us to doubt apparently simple notions of photographic truth.​